Category Archives: Euro 2012

Future Blues

Latest Chelsea rumors and realities

After a slow start to the traditional summer transfer craziness due to the Euro 2012 tourney, things are about to heat up.  Now that the Euro 2012 Final is history (congrats to Spain!) clubs will be scrambling in July to assemble their rosters in time for the new season.

Here are some of the latest rumors involving current or potential Chelsea players.  These are solely rumors, approximately 99.9 % of which are planted by players’ agents, so all must be taken with a large grain of salt:

The LA Galaxy might offer Frank Lampard a two-year deal to go Hollywood.  Not sure how they would cram in another designated player when they’ve already got Keane, Beckham, and Donovan, but if any MLS team can finagle it, LA can.  Lampard is such a Chelsea stalwart that I can’t imagine him leaving.  If he had to go, it would be fun to see him in MLS, but I don’t want Lamps to leave Chelsea!

Chelsea has supposedly declined an offer from FC Copenhagen to acquire Romelu Lukaku on loan for the upcoming season.  Hope this means Chelsea is going to work Lukaku into the lineup more next season.  Looking forward to seeing what the Belgian has to offer.

I’ve read a couple rumors about Chelsea being interested in Arsenal’s Theo Walcott.  I file this one under “unexciting”.  Walcott hasn’t been a consistent starter for Arsenal and I feel like Chelsea already has a similar player in Daniel Sturridge.  I’d rather keep Sturridge.

Chelsea seems quite interested in Wigan striker Victor Moses, but their initial offer was apparently laughed off by Wigan.  Moses is semi-interesting, but I’d rather see Chelsea give Sturridge and Lukaku a chance to fulfill their potential.

Chelsea may try to get right back Maicon from Inter Milan.  Don’t know much about him, but it might be a good idea as Chelsea ended up defensively short-handed late last season due to injuries.

Paris St. Germain may try to pry John Terry away from Chelsea.  While Terry’s also a perennial Blue, I actually wouldn’t be too disappointed to see him go.  For all his defensive prowess and leadership, he sure has made some boneheaded moves over the years.  And there’s still the small matter of his pending racial abuse case involving his on-field clash with QPR’s Anton Ferdinand last season.  I seriously doubt Chelsea will let Terry go though.

Finally, Chelsea is not renewing contracts for Salomon Kalou and Jose Bosingwa.  Both are players I won’t miss very much.  Their Chelsea seasons were a mixed bag of helpfulness and hurtfulness.  Still, they’ll always be a part of Chelsea nostalgia for their contributions to the club’s first Champions League title.

Which of these are good ideas?  Bad ideas?  Feel free to weigh in below…

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No Goals, No Problem

When a 0-0 draw is no big deal

 

My daughter and I at her first FC Dallas match Saturday night.

Saturday night I went to FC Dallas Stadium to see FC Dallas’ first home match in over a month.  I was excited because my seven-year-old daughter was with me for her first-ever professional soccer match.

The night began well.  We got my regular parking spot (strategically located for maximum post-game traffic evasion).  I enjoyed the way her grip tightened on my hand as the sights and sounds of the looming stadium enveloped her.  Bought her a cute FC Dallas shirt in the team shop.  Saw Dirk Nowitzki towering over a horde of fans, gamely dishing out autographs (he had been the honorary pre-game Lamar Hunt statue scarfer).  I had to explain to my daughter who the giant was and why folks were mobbing him.

My time-conscious daughter was very anxious to get to our seats before game time, so I abandoned my quest to get a program.  What dads won’t do for their daughters!  We made it to our fifth row seats with minutes to spare.  She was impressed with her unobstructed view and our proximity to the field.  I was impressed with our sitting on the shady side of the stadium.  My daughter enjoyed Hooper’s (FCD’s mascot) pre-game antics, though she was too timid for me to summon him for a photo op.

So far I had engineered an ideal start to our first pro soccer outing together.  If the sailing continued to be this smooth, I’d have a lifetime of father/daughter soccer bonding to look forward to.  But just as I was feeling pretty good about myself, I forgot to warn her about the bone-rattling fireworks explosions that always accompany the conclusion of the Star-Spangled Banner at FCD Stadium.  She cowered.  I comforted and apologized for the lack of a heads-up.  Her smile returned.  Whew!  Crisis averted.  When she was five, a similar incident might’ve ended our night at the national anthem.

I was glad to see Brek Shea in the starting eleven after ages away due to suspension and injury.  Things were looking up.  This was surely the night FC Dallas would turn their miserable season around!

And then the game started.  Neither Dallas nor Chivas USA was capable of stringing together three passes.  At one point a dude sitting on our row asked his kids if they “noticed a difference between their [Dallas & Chivas] passing and the game we saw this afternoon [Spain v. France Euro 2012 quarterfinal]?”  He and I exchanged knowing glances and I replied, “Just a little bit.”  I wanted to apologize to my daughter for the choppy, foul-a-minute mess we were witnessing.  But she seemed to think the teams were pretty good.

The real goal-scoring opportunities were few and far between for both sides (only four shots on target all night – 3 for Dallas, 1 for Chivas).  Dallas knocked on the door more often, but couldn’t close the deal.  As the match reached the 80th minute, I really began to sweat because I desperately wanted my daughter to experience a goal at her first MLS game.  Otherwise she might never want to go with me again!  They score actual goals in the soccer league she plays in.  Usually lots of them.  What was this 0-0 madness?

By the time we reached 85 minutes, I wanted to pull my hair out.  Not only were we dangerously close to my daughter not seeing a goal, but I could see the shades being pulled on Dallas’ season!  My daughter even sheepishly admitted she wouldn’t mind if Chivas scored – she just wanted to see a goal!  I wasn’t willing to stoop to that level of goal desperation, but I understood her plight.  The entire future of our father/daughter soccer bonding was at stake and these knuckleheads couldn’t even get a shot on goal!  I suddenly felt the urge to pitch-invade, to sprint toward the FCD players, screaming like a banshee, “Can’t you see my daughter needs you to score?!”

Alas, even with three minutes of stoppage time, Dallas couldn’t find the back of the net.  What a letdown.  What a dreary season.  Dallas’ longest winless streak since 2005.  But mostly I was disappointed for my daughter.  Bless her heart, she kept emphasizing how much she’d wanted to see a goal.  Why did I feel like such a failure?  They’re the ones who couldn’t kick the ball into the giant nets mounted at each end of the field!

But then, the goalless draw – that inexplicable bane of soccer’s existence for average American sports fans – was implausibly redeemed.  We weren’t even out of the stadium yet when my daughter leaned closer and asked, “Dad, can I come with you every time you go to FC Dallas games?”

Hear that, FCD players?  You owe us a couple goals next time.

Allez Les Bleus!

Why I’m rooting for France in Euro 2012

A lot of people don’t like France.  Or maybe it’s French folks they dislike.  And I can understand that a little.  They can be culturally snooty sometimes; though so can pretty much every other nationality on earth.  And from a soccer standpoint I can understand why people wouldn’t like the French national team seeing as two of the most infamous meltdowns in World Cup history were perpetrated by les Bleus.  There was Zinedine Zidane’s head butt of Italy’s Marco Materazzi that may have cost France the World Cup title in 2006.  Then there was the undetected hand-ball by Thierry Henry that unfairly sent France instead of Ireland to World Cup 2010 in South Africa.  The team imploded in South Africa, with coach Raymond Domenech kicking Nicolas Anelka off the team and the rest of the squad refusing to practice at one point in protest.

Particularly after the World Cup 2010 incident, the French team gained the reputation (whether accurate or not) as selfish mega-stars that cared more about themselves than representing their country honorably.  Since then, the French Football Federation wisely dumped strange Coach Domenech and hired Laurent Blanc, an alum from the World Cup ’98 winning French side.  Blanc has successfully overhauled the French squad, giving new youngsters a chance while reincorporating the megastars.  France has plenty of megastars by the way, including Benzema, Ribery, Nasri, Malouda, and Ben Arfa.

So why in the world would I root for France in the Euros this summer?  It’s a personal connection.  I lived in France for nine months when I was eleven-years-old.  Nine months can make a big impression at any age, but especially when you’re eleven.  I really liked soccer before we moved to France, but I really loved soccer within a couple weeks of living in France.  It was very contagious.  I was playing pick-up games with neighborhood kids the first day I was there!  Couldn’t understand a word they were saying at that point, but soccer bridged the gaps.  And the soccer never relented the whole time I was there.

Since I attended a French public school in Tours, France, I was naturally influenced by their player and team preferences, which of course included the French national team.  Euro ’88 was my first European Championship experience.  I was hooked.  I ended up cheering on Holland because I liked Ruud Gullit and because France hadn’t qualified.  The French weren’t too happy about that, particularly since they’d won the title in 1984.  I’ve rooted for France ever since my time living there, with a couple of exceptions – if they’re playing the U.S. obviously, and at the 2002 World Cup I cheered for Senegal over France because I also lived in Senegal for five years.  But that’s another story.

When it comes to the Euros, I love watching the tournament, but the fun is enhanced when you have a team to cheer on.  France has their issues, but I’m sticking with them.  Not because of particular players, but because when I watch them, I remember the faces of all the French classmates I ran with at school and on the playground, whose exuberance for les Bleus and football itself had an effect on me that has never quite faded.

(France plays their opening game of Euro 2012 against England on Monday, June 11, at 11:00 AM (Central) on ESPN)

Who will you root for in Euro 2012?